The IT Side Effects of Healthcare Technology

March 22, 2017

Healthcare is a big umbrella of an industry, and beneath it you will find a complex community comprised of healthcare providers, payers, pharmaceutical companies and patients. Few industries have experienced the transformative powers of technology quite like the healthcare sector has in the last decade. The new "health IT" solutions disrupting the status quo have brought on a fundamental operational change.

Every member of a medical care team today is expected to collaborate and coordinate in the delivery of care to a patient (now seen as clients) and maintain and contribute to a digital record. And providers expect patient/clients to be fully engaged in their own care. The Big Data, AI and data analytics being used across other industries are now being used in healthcare to diagnose disease, identify treatment options and improve patient outcomes. IBM's Watson brings predictive modeling and data driven analytics to oncology outcomes. With 3-D printing technology custom fitted hearing aids can be built today where they couldn't have been imagined a few years back.

Healthy Data Centre Strategies

And all of this points to an ever increasing demand for data centre capacity because all of these new applications and technologies call for aggregating and storing data and processing information to make new healthcare solutions work. As these applications get more complex and begin using more storage and computing power, they create challenges for the IT infrastructure and data centres of healthcare providers. What data should remain "in house"? Should "life critical" data be in the cloud?

Listening to an Expert

To learn more about these healthcare technologies and the impact they're having on the data centres of health systems, hospitals and doctors' offices, we sat down for a conversation with Dan Ephraim, a data centre expert at Digitlal Realty with deep knowledge of healthcare industry data challenges.

Here is what Dan had to say:

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